Peace in War – A short story.

‘This has choked again. The chitchat guns are the worst in the world. Even dogs bark
louder than these guns.’ Looking at my paralyzed gun I ordered a dozen INSAS
through my field telephone. I was at the Fazilka border with my 550 men enjoying a
dominant fight over a bunch of 100 soldiers. The opponent had poor ammunition
and of course the numbers. They were heavily wounded, praying for mercy, calling out
for help, and yelling their relatives’ names. And those who were still untouched were
shouting slogans and abuses.

Peace in War.

However, this was the first time my conscience hit me about the humane side of the
war. Every soldier is fighting for his country. Everyone has families and dreams. Dying at
such a young age is unnatural and non-justifiable. Why should I become the reason for
their death? Why should I take this moral pain? I won’t be able to bear this grief.
‘Salaam sahab’ ‘Here is your order of 12 INSAS Rifles’ Subedar Hukum Singh was
standing beside me with a glare in his eyes. We will smash them like mosquitoes, he
said. I nodded yes.
But would it be fair to butcher all of them at once? I outnumber them and own cutting-edge weapons. Is it ethical?? Or is it even legal?? I envy those who say everything is
fair in love and war. It would have been great if I could lose my thinking for once and
clear the ground altogether. The amount of oxytocin in my body increased so much that I decided to cease the fire. Now the question was about my guts to order the
same.

Suddenly, a voice came out of the field telephone. ‘This is your new captain, Rohan
Rai’. Honestly, I have never heard of the name Rohan Rai. I was not aware of any Rohan
in my battalion. However, I paid heed to his instructions. He first of all appreciated my
efforts at the checkpoint. He was happy with the way I had eliminated targets. He
wanted me to continue the same.

‘Don’t deviate from your duty, your karma’, it’s the duty that matters, not the character.
You are already of high character if you are following your duty. Duty keeps you intact
with the righteous path. It doesn’t allow you to break away from it. It is the greatest form
of virtue. I was amazed that he knew every single bit of my heart. He even
knew the moral war which I was facing. He knew my guilt and my insecurities. ‘War was
the last option in the power dynamics’. We were not sad about it. But it was our last
resort. After all, power is a zero-sum game. Imagine if you win this war you bring power
to your country. This would bring the authority to control especially economic
resources. This is the only way to bring prosperity to your people. The glory to your
people. Do you want to be the reason for the deprivation of crores of poor and the death of your fellow soldiers? Remember, he who kicks at the womb kills the baby. ‘Hope
you will do your best, Jai Hind.’

When the call ended, I was agitated and fragile. My thinking was shaped. There was no
clarity of thought and I was in the midst of confusion. The confusion was driving me to a
state of chaos. My men started getting dominated. I was all the more disturbed. In haste,
I called up the captain again. ‘Hello, Rohan sir’, ‘who Rohan, i m your captain Ranjeet
Chawla’. ‘Sir, Captain Rohan contacted me a while ago’, ‘There is no guy called Rohan in
this battalion. wake up from your dream and start a fierce fight’.

The confusion fused into my head after the captain disconnected. The firing of bullets
increases like a rocket. My men were getting shot. They started yelling for their life,
begging for mercy, praying for mercy, calling out for help, and yelling their relatives’ names.
Looking at this I forgot all my anger and frustration. I yelled for an open fire on the
enemy. I was determined to uproot them from scratch. No one in the battalion has seen
such a fierce shape of mine. Every man got goosebumps and started firing with double
stamina. Everything looked pumped. The scene was hyped and different. But among all
the differences I could only mark that Jai Hind was now accompanied by Jai Shree
Krishna.

Leave a Comment